358AB1E45156C52D81BAE579E952FBD1
Jun 042012
 

Tone-on-tone decorating refers to combining different tonal variations of the same color.  Whether you lean towards the calming greens of jade, moss, mint, apple and emerald for your bedroom or would love your living room to be awash with blues that are as deep as the ocean or as light as the sky, decorating with these colours tone-on-tone will evoke a connection with nature like no other will.

Wood

Working with harmonious natural wood tones is so fresh. Unless your intention is rustic wood cabin, keep your eye out for contemporary pieces of furniture or items with a modern twist.  Try using the natural hues of wood as an accent among the blues or greens. Grey also works well and adds a refined appeal. A throw rug in a steely grey tossed across the back of a chair, stainless-steel benches, polished-concrete floors or chunky rugs that run from grey into grey-blue would all be right at home.

tone-on-tone decorating

tone-on-tone decorating

Panels of highly grained timber are beautiful backdrops for lighter cabinets or timber cut-outs, which are affordable pieces of art in themselves. Wood is so tactile that collecting special pieces can become quite an obsession.

Blue and green tones

There’s a growing global trend for harmonious colour combinations, particularly using tones of blue with other tones of blue as well as shades of green with green. Mixing it up with natural elements such as timber, which itself has lots of variations in both colour and texture, relaxes the look, making it a perfect palette for the way we live in South Africa.

The key to making this work is balance. Pattern is wonderful but aim for a ratio of 30 per cent pattern against 70 per cent plain if you want the space to feel calm. Texture, be it in the scuffed-up paint on a treasured kitchen chair or the mottled pigment of a chalky wall, adds warmth through the suggestion of age. Bring in a breath of fresh, seasonal air with flowers in shades of the same colour: think hydrangea, cornflower, iris and lavender for starters.

All shades of blue work well together. Deep inky blues offset turquoise shades and a dash of white brightens everything.

tone-on-tone decorating

Blue, in all its forms, be it cobalt, navy, royal, aqua or eggshell, is a meditative colour and green evokes harmony, making both perfect for a bedroom.

Forest, citrus and emerald greens sparkle when grouped in displays of glass or dishes piled high on open shelves. Living with blues and greens isn’t about matching shades, as the effect may look contrived. It’s the subtle contrast between colours that makes this tone-on-tone approach so refreshing. It’s a great starting point for any decorating experiment.

tone-on-tone decorating

Source: homelife.com.au

 

 

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Mar 282012
 

Minimalist doesn’t have to mean cold. Add life, warmth and beauty to your modern interiors with the help of wood

Natural woods work wonders when combined with the clean and modern lines of minimalist design.  When contrasted against shiny metal, stone surfaces and crisp white details, wood is fully capable of taking center stage in any home. Here are some creative ideas for making this splendid natural material part of your space.

The wood perfectly balances the crisp walls and rough texture of the stone.

No need for a fancy upholstered headboard here. The wood makes an understated impression without taking any space away from the room.

Not your ’70s ceiling. To make wood work above, you need to make sure you have either enough ceiling height or enough square footage. Otherwise, it may make your room feel cramped and claustrophobic.   Here, the designers followed Frank Lloyd Wright‘s rule: in a large space, keep your ceilings low to force the eye to look outside.

On the other hand, beautiful tall ceilings with loads of natural light creates a very different effect from the previous photo.  Add modern lighting and clean, shiny floors for an updated look.

Perhaps one of the most stunning uses of wood materials happens to also be practical – an old-school countertop. A large slab of wood takes center stage in this industrial kitchen.

Wood even works well in bathrooms.  Even though the grain of this wood is subtle, it contrasts beautifully against the otherwise all-white bathroom.

For the wood connoisseur, a mix of grains & species. This example showcases three varieties of natural wood; all work beautifully together because of the difference in texture and grain.

Wood looks striking above the fireplace.

Wood can be used very effectively in contrast to a predominant material, such as metal. In this case, the wood breaks up both the vertical nature of the screen & its smooth metal texture.

When used in unusual places, it makes a one-of-a-kind statement that is hard to ignore. If used outdoors, wood should be treated with the proper sealants to ensure its longevity

Source: houzz.com

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Dec 102011
 

The company that designed the Toledo stool was originally a bicycle company that changed to making furniture as cars began to take over.  The Toledo Metal Furniture Company’s furniture was designed to stand up to rugged conditions. These stools, designed in the early 1900s, were created with schools, industrial shops and tradespeople in mind. Their charming silhouettes and mix of bent wood and metal create a look that can go vintage industrial, mid-century modern, traditional or contemporary.

The Toledo stool is a classic piece with an industrial aesthetic that can work in just about any style of room.

Here the stools add Industrial-Age character to the mid-century vibe of this home.

Combined with the reclaimed wood, exposed brick and metal finishes, the vintage Toledo stools fit right in with industrial warehouse design of this loft.

These stools are not limited to the kitchen either. In the same loft, another vintage Toledo provides a perch in front of the mirror.

This is the backless cousin of the Toledo stool.

The wood on the stools harmonizes with the wooden table, benches and beams. The smaller stools next to the ottoman repeat this aesthetic.

This sleek kitchen gets some patina style from the rough-hewn beam, bin pull hardware and the addition of the Toledo stools.

Source: houzz.com

Dec 052011
 

The industrial style has always been popular in one form or another.  Lately even more so where an old building or loft gets converted into a living space. Today however the style is a lot lighter and sleeker with a modern touch.

Characteristic of this style is the use of concrete and steel or having patches of raw brickwork on the walls. (these walls are more often than not, turned into a design feature). To add a warm element to this style, you can incorporate wood, glass and plexi. A touch of the earthy element will only enhance this look.

Colour palette for the Industrial style is black with different hues of grey’s and white. Textiles that are basic and has no patterns work well with this look and is a great way to add texture into your design. Make sure that you get an industrial edge in your design by using furniture that could have come from a factory. “Form follows Function” is the key elements of these furniture, they were not designed for the esthetic but to  serve a purpose. Be on the lookout for metal with patina, matte surfaces or sleek and shiny metals. If you want the authentic furniture and accessories to achieve this look, second-hand shops are a treasure trove. By recycling and using these furniture pieces,  you will also be doing your bit to help save our environment.

Like it?  Let us know what you think

And,

If you liked this, you would probably also like to view our posts on Typography and Concrete in design.

Oct 062011
 

I’ve always loved the combination of concrete, steel and wood in architecture.  With the building of our own home the project team thought me quite ‘loony’ for wanting the natural concrete to stay without paint.  I just loved the rich natural colour and texture so much!  The colour of the concrete in this house is the exact shade which reminded me so much of that look and feel.  In the end I got at least one double volume feature wall.  The house featured below proves my point and, believe me, for our next house I will definitely build my case with the help of the beautiful pictures!  I absolutely love the way the architects managed to frame the views and the combination of all the natural elements are striking.

Washington Park Residence in Seattle, Washington, exhibits a fascinating facade made of thick and thermally insulated concrete walls. These walls are “layered and modulated to offer carefully framed views from west-facing rooms, add depth and shadow to the facade, and orchestrate the entry sequence through the courtyard to the front door.Sullivan Conard Architects made sure that the house overlooking Lake Washington and the Cascades captured extensive views without interfering with the much-needed privacy.

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

Source: freshome.com via Irma on Pinterest

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