358AB1E45156C52D81BAE579E952FBD1
Jul 052012
 

New shades and tones have sown the seeds of a mustard revival, and rooms everywhere are reaping the benefit.

Mustard has gone from dated to dashing. Yellow can be a difficult color to work with, but the browns in mustard make it a little easier to approach. Need proof? Just look at the varied personalities that mustard takes on below.

Muted. Deep gray keeps a mustard coverlet and pillows in check, preserving this bedroom’s quiet air.

Subtle. Add a splash of colour to an all-white scheme.

Strong.To pull off a yellow sofa, you need a room to stand up to the impact. These graphic schemes rises to the challenge.
Mod. Deep mustard yellow, a classic mid-century hue, perfectly complements the retro attitude of this living area and reflects the golden flooring color.

The perfect foil for the graphical pattern in the curtains

Source: hgtv.com

Glam. Mustard-yellow adds a swanky top note

Source: Erin on Pinterest

Formal.Mustard shows its traditional side in this gracious living room
Cheery. This yellow door simply beams, drawing visitors right in.

Eclectic. It’s hard to imagine another wall color that would look as fitting as mustard does in this casual bedroom. It’s just offbeat enough to support the whimsical gallery wall.

Source: houzz.com

Enhanced by Zemanta
Jul 042012
 

Perched on a rocky highveld koppie in Johannesburg, this sophisticated Westcliff pavilion embodies ‘rustic materiality’…

Architects Silvio Rech and Lesley Carstens chose a design and materials that reflect the natural, rocky surrounds and echoes the archetypical highveld veranda houses.  A glass and ironwood pavilion was built separate from the main home.  It is here where the owners can relax and entertain, as well as host guests or visiting family members.  They combined the elements of the glass ‘box’ with the rammed earth wall that runs its length, plunging into the indoor pool and re-emerging on the level below.

Boasting hi-tech sophistication and seemingly simple comfort, it’s a space that is both ultra-practical and ‘exceedingly calm’.

 

westcliff pavillion

‘A pure ironwood pavilion against a garden backdrop’.

westcliff pavillion

The rammed-earth wall spans the downstairs bathroom and the upper level.

A ‘Drop’ fireplace from Antrax Italy heats the living area.

The ironwood bed is by Silvio and Lesley, and the tapestry is by Albert Redelinghuys.

The indoor swimming pool.

A tree is the focal point of the interior. The sea-urchin throw was made by Danny Myburgh of Maymott (maymott.com).

 

Images via

Enhanced by Zemanta
Jul 022012
 

The Quatrefoil has been used in gothic architecture for centuries and has recently had a resurgence in the interiors world. The quatrefoil motif isn’t new to the design scene, but there seems to be a renewed love for this fabulous design.

Quatrefoil is a type of decorative framework consisting of a symmetrical shape which forms the overall outline of four partially overlapping circles of the same diameter. The word quatrefoil means “four leaves”, from Latin quattuor, four, plus folium, a leaf.[1]) and applies to general four-lobed shapes in various contexts.

The shape is commonly used in windows with four equal lobes, like a four-leafed clover. Quatrefoil design can be incorporated into a minimalist look, or can be paired with bold, bright colors. Introduce it in one furniture piece or in numerous applications throughout your home.

Whether it’s a chair, headboard, wall plaque or an inexpensive mirror, it can add panache to any space!

Source: decorpad.com

Source: decorpad.com

Source: google.com

Source: tumblr.com

 

Sources: sasinteriors.net; designfieldnotes.com

Enhanced by Zemanta
Jun 252012
 

The popularity of Ikat textiles in home decor and interior design this year, is hard to ignore. This global pattern is appearing everywhere from rugs to furniture and in accessories.

The word Ikat (pronounced “ee-cot”) means “to tie” or “to bind” and comes from the unique method of manual weaving that creates the iconic pattern. It requires first tying off the warp or weft threads in bundles before resist dyeing them. The cloth is then later weaved together on a loom using a weft, warp, or double Ikat method. Originating in Southeast Asia, ikat fabrics can be extremely ornate and intricate, often featuring detailed designs or larger pictures. In modern times, the motif is created through either woven or printing methods, and is readily available in any color palette of choice.

With so many exciting pattern variants and colors to choose from, your ikat options are endless! Start with something subtle like a throw pillow or decorative bowl or dive in head first with wallpaper, bedding, an upholstered chair or sofa. Ikat looks glamorous but never looses its bold playfulness. Enjoy these beautiful & unexpected ways to incorporate it into your home!

Source: decor4all.com

Source: bhg.com

 

Additional sources: bhg.com; merrimentstyle.com

Jun 132012
 

Every year House Beautiful publishes an issue with Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers. The issue includes small bits of wisdom from some of their favorite people in the interior design industry. Experts like Christopher Peacock, Myra Hoefer, Carleton Varney, and 33 other inspiring designers share words to live and design by.

I loved reading what everyone has to say, and even learned a thing or two.  Here are some of the things I believe whole-heartedly, and others that I found to be useful.
If you could contribute to this article, what would you say?
Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers

Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers

Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers

Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers

Decorating Secrets from Top Interior Designers

 

View more here: http://pinterest.com/housebeautiful/top-designer-secret-quotes/

Images via:

Source: houzz.com; llamasvalley.blogspot; teenagster; delightbydesign; brightboldbeautiful.blogspot; convoy.tumblr; thebrickhouse.tumblr; millashem.blogspot; centsationalgirl; decorpad; boydlighting; mc5; decorating.yourway;

358AB1E45156C52D81BAE579E952FBD1