Aug 212012
 

This very mod­ern res­i­dence in Israel man­ages to blur indoor/outdoor bound­aries in a way that is both calm­ing and quite spectacular.

The home, designed by Levy:Chamizer Archi­tects, wraps around its out­door areas offer­ing plenty of leisure oppor­tu­ni­ties.  The impres­sive swim­ming pool is the focal point and each room opens up towards it with the help of large win­dows.  The open plan living/dining is the most spec­tac­u­lar zone of the house, with views towards not only the pool, but also to the lovely green area on the oppo­site side of the house.

I love the con­trast between black & white through­out the house and the warmth added by the wooden floors.  It has a feel­ing of peace­ful­ness with comfy beds  and front row seats to the pool.

Indoor/Outdoor boundaries

 

Source: freshome.com

 

 

Aug 072012
 

A Con­tem­po­rary Los Ange­les villa by Michael Lehrer cap­tures the essence of the L.A. lifestyle.

This epic project was 13 years in the mak­ing. The own­ers, a retired busi­ness­man & sculp­tor, and his wife — a for­mer land­scape designer - wanted a light-filled dwelling that would feel as though it were part of the set­ting; a shel­tered piece of land replete with old-growth trees.

Lehrer took the idea of indoor/outdoor liv­ing so essen­tial to the L.A. lifestyle and inter­preted it in a three-story, 13,000-square-foot struc­ture with mas­sive slid­ing and piv­ot­ing glass walls.  Doors and win­dows con­vert indoor spaces into true open-air pavil­ions. The liv­ing room has six mov­able glass wall pan­els, stretch­ing 42 feet, which can be ganged in one stack, effec­tively mak­ing the room a part of the adja­cent gar­den ter­race.  A ground plane of Alham­bra lime­stone runs between indoors and out, its thresh­old nearly invisible.

You can see the beau­ti­ful gar­dens and trees wher­ever you are.  The house frames the land­scapes and allows nat­ural light in, and the inte­rior is sooth­ing and com­fort­able.  Not sur­pris­ingly, the own­ers love of stone is evi­dent throughout.

Contemporary Los Angeles Villa

Contemporary Los Angeles Villa

Alham­bra lime­stone from Walker Zanger extends from the liv­ing areas out onto a capa­cious ter­race shaded by a Chi­nese elm.

A gravel court­yard with a stately cork oak offers access to the res­i­dence on three sides; walls of glass, at left and right, flank a steel-troweled-stucco façade.

The sculp­ture stu­dio is faced with custom-made paneling.

Mas­sive flag­stones lead guests from the front gar­den into the din­ing room, which in turn leads to the liv­ing room and another gar­den beyond.

The horizontal-grain maple pan­el­ing and the kitchen’s cab­i­netry, stainless-steel hood, coun­ters, and sinks are all by Bulthaup, the cook­top is by Gagge­nau, and the ovens are by Wolf.  Bon­tempi Casa chairs sur­round a custom-made din­ing table.

Italian-onyx coun­ters and a maple vanity.

A tub with a pic­ture window.

 The indoor/outdoor shower, sur­faced in honed lime­stone and marble.

The mas­ter suite.

Another per­spec­tive on the mas­ter suite.

 

 

 

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Jul 302012
 

I’m just lov­ing the neu­tral palette of Kelly Klein’s Palm Beach home.  The wood against white has a sur­pris­ing calm­ing effect and adds  just the right amount of tex­ture to the over­all  min­i­mal­ist style.

Kelly was wife to Calvin Klein, but the two divorced in 2006.  She is a noted pho­tog­ra­pher and author (her sixth book, Pools: Reflec­tions, a sequel to the 1992 best­seller Pools, will be pub­lished by Riz­zoli next month). Work­ing with David Pis­cuskas of 1100 Archi­tect, Kelly built an inti­mate get­away that’s a per­fect fit for her bliss­ful new life.

I wanted some­thing a lit­tle Neu­tra, a lit­tle Ando, a lit­tle Bauhaus–y.  I knew in my mind how I wanted to live here—in an indoor-outdoor house, enjoy­ing the breeze off the water, with the fam­ily always together,” Klein says. “I find that in big houses every­body is always in a dif­fer­ent room, no one can find each other. I was going to build a really com­pact house. I call the four bed­rooms my hotel rooms.”

Kelly Klein's Palm Beach Home

Kelly Klein's Palm Beach Home

 

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Jul 282012
 

Two archi­tects trans­form an aban­doned sta­ble on a rugged plot of land in Extremadura, Spain, into an off-the-grid hide­away with an urban edge.

To min­i­mize the impact on the unspoiled envi­ron­ment in the province of Cáceres, the archi­tects — and own­ers of the sustainability-focused design firm Ába­ton in Madrid — reused the stone from the old sta­ble to con­struct their remote fam­ily get­away. Reclaimed oak doors and ceil­ings and recycled-steel beams con­tribute to the weather-beaten farm­house appeal.  On the inside, the design is closer to a mod­ern ware­house loft. Con­crete walls, lime­stone floors, and pati­nated rail­ings are tell­tale signs of this aes­thetic. The loft bed­rooms were con­verted from the stable’s orig­i­nal hay lofts and a min­i­mal­ist kitchen fea­ture a sleek coun­ter­top that extends into a din­ing room table. An inte­rior court­yard and foun­tain pay homage to the home’s power sup­ply with the help of wind tur­bines. Win­ter­time energy is har­vested from two moun­tain streams and in the sum­mer, solar pan­els do the trick. “We’re always try­ing to respect the envi­ron­ment by learn­ing as much as we can from it,” say the architects.

Off-the-grid hideaway

Off-the-grid hideaway

Off-the-grid hideaway

 

Source: remodelista.com

Jul 262012
 

Embed­ded in the lush veg­e­ta­tion of Zim­bali, lies SGNW House.  Designed by Metro­pole Archi­tectsit is noth­ing short of spec­tac­u­lar.  This mod­ern home offers details that inspire and amaze.

Koi ponds, water fea­tures and a rim flow pool appear to merge into one, and flow through the house into the for­est.  The main bed­room suite can­tilevers six meters over the pool below, pro­vid­ing pro­tec­tion from the weather on the patio and adding that “wow” fac­tor.  Nat­ural tim­ber, off shut­ter con­crete, water and nat­ural stone cladding off­set the clean archi­tec­tural lines.  In the inte­rior a dar­ing mix of col­ors and dec­o­rat­ing ele­ments make each room more sur­pris­ing than the next.

Every­thing “Zim­bali” is done on a grand scale and the entrance to the house is no execp­tion - “WoW”!

Zimbali

Zimbali

Zimbali

 

Source: freshome.com

 

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